Day 4 - Chyamche (1430 m) to Danakyu (2300 m)


20th October - We set off at 8.00 AM full of cornbread, tea and hope. Up, up and up through a very deep gorge with a raging river in the bottom. It was very busy on the trail with lots of people coming down possibly an increase in the usual volume as the Thorung La Pass was still closed. We were joined by numerous loaded donkey trains going both up and down. We spent a lot of time waiting for these donkey trains to pass, side stepping Germans who were being German, and French who were being elegant and chatted to everyone else. One of the donkey trains coming down appeared to have youngsters running free. When asked the man in charge said they were not babies they were ‘makee learn’. We and donkeys had to walk through several biggish waterfalls that ran over the trail and down the gorge side. It was a hard start to what proved to be a long hard day. At the top we met a group of adults from Hereford and Worcester, also a group of girls from Hereford Cathedral School. From here it was a short hike down into the village where much needed food was eaten.  


The guides and porters had their usual meal of daal bhaat. They eat this at least twice a day. It consists of steamed rice and a cooked lentil soup called daal.


During the afternoon we passed a woman who epitomised the modern Nepalese. Her work style was traditional whilst a fully paid up member of the technological age.


[The Outward Journey] [Day 1 - Besisahar to Bhulbhule] [Day 2 - Bhulbhule  to Bahundanda] [Day 3 - Bahundanda  to Chyamche]

[Day 4 - Chyamche to Danakyu] [Day 5 - Danakyu to Chame] [Day 6 - Chame to Lower Pisang] [Day 7 - Lower Pisang to Manang]

[Day 8 - Manang to Chame] [Day 9 - Chame to Tal to Chyamche] [Day 10 Chyamche to Besisahar to Kathmandu]


At the foot of a steep gorge

At the foot of the steep gorge

A loaded donkey train

Guides and porters enjoy a meal

Tradition meets technology

A donkey train Guides and porters take a meal break Traditional meets technology

Day 5 - Danakyu (2200 m) to Chame  (2670 m)


21st October  - Today we observed more Nepalese at work. They are a resourceful people using what they have to sustain their daily lives.


There were men splitting and weaving bamboo into the baskets used as chicken coops, water bottle holders and to carry goods on their backs.

Drying beans and sweetcorn Drying apples Arrival at Chang Construction workers

Construction workers

A resourceful worker

Man splitting and weaving bamboo

Bamboo worker

Working with bamboo Weaving bamboo Resourceful worker

Later we passed two women carrying huge loads on their backs using these baskets.


We passed a saw pit where tree trunks are sawn into planks by hand using a method that has not changed in thousands of years.


There were people carrying various loads on their backs. One man was carrying planks, another collecting and loading stones from the river bed onto a wooden frame which he then carried back to the road building site.

People were taking advantage of the sunshine and drying beans, sweetcorn, fungi and apples.


Eventually we reached Chame.

Women carrying baskets Workers carrying loads on their backs Loading stones from the river bed A saw pit

Women carrying baskets on their heads

A traditional saw pit

Workers carrying loads on their backs

Loading stones from the river bed onto a wooden frame

Drying beans and sweetcorn in the sun

Drying apples in the sun

Arrival at Chame

[The Outward Journey] [Day 1 - Besisahar to Bhulbhule] [Day 2 - Bhulbhule  to Bahundanda] [Day 3 - Bahundanda  to Chyamche]

[Day 4 - Chyamche to Danakyu] [Day 5 - Danakyu to Chame] [Day 6 - Chame to Lower Pisang] [Day 7 - Lower Pisang to Manang]

[Day 8 - Manang to Chame] [Day 9 - Chame to Tal to Chyamche] [Day 10 Chyamche to Besisahar to Kathmandu]


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 The Annapurna Trek - Up, Up and Up