Day 6 - Chame (2670 m) to Lower Pisang (3200 m)


22nd October - As usual up at 6 AM, breakfast at 7 AM and on the circuit for another long day by 8 AM leaving behind Hotel Shangri-La and its ‘ensuite’ arrangements. Again it was steadily up with some more severe climbs. The scenery was stunning.   


 It wasn’t just trekkers on the circuit. There were mountain bike riders too.


[The Outward Journey] [Day 1 - Besisahar to Bhulbhule] [Day 2 - Bhulbhule  to Bahundanda] [Day 3 - Bahundanda  to Chyamche]

[Day 4 - Chyamche to Danakyu] [Day 5 - Danakyu to Chame] [Day 6 - Chame to Lower Pisang] [Day 7 - Lower Pisang to Manang]

[Day 8 - Manang to Chame] [Day 9 - Chame to Tal to Chyamche] [Day 10 Chyamche to Besisahar to Kathmandu]

Leaving Hotel Shangri-La

Leaving Hotel Shangri-La

Moving steadily upwards

Stunning mountain scenery

A mountain motorbiker

Stunning scenery Stunning scenery A mountain motorcyclist

Porters come in all shapes and sizes. Kalyan’s brother who is a student seemed particularly small for such a heavy load. There seemed to be an affectionate bond between porters. But being a porter isn’t the domain of men only. There were women as well.


We crossed wooden and suspension bridges sometimes no handed!


A murder of crows Children collecting offerings Herding goats Kalyan's brother

A deceptively slight porter

Porters relaxing

Crossing a wooden bridge

Crossing solo

Crossing a suspension bridge Dave goes it alone Porters relaxing

It was during this part of the trek we first encountered snow, ice and an avalanche that had taken out part of the trail. It was evidence of the snow storm that had inundated the region on Tuesday 14th October.


Day 7 - Lower Pisang (3200 m) to Manang (3540 m)


23rd October - As we journeyed up the trail we became more and more aware of the Buddhist influence. In the villages there were long lines of prayer wheels. We passed stupas with prayer flags and stones that were placed on top of the walls inscribed with what the guide indicated were prayers.


Alongside Buddhism is Hinduism. The Festival of Tihar was being celebrated. This is the Festival of Lights. Apparently the first day of the festival is called Kag Tihar, the worship of crows. Offerings of sweets and dishes are placed on the roof of houses. The cawing of crows symbolizes sadness and grief in the Hindu mythology, so devotees offer the crows food to avert grief and deaths in their homes. Were these crows arriving in Lower Pisang for the offerings?


From the third day onwards we saw and heard children singing with an accompanying drum and collecting ‘offerings’ which we understand possibly go towards a community picnic.


We encountered more snow and ice and a family attempting to travel by motorbike.


We passed a girl herding goats and Manang Air Strip which is no longer used as it is considered unsafe to fly aircraft in and out because of cross winds.


And so at last we reached our destination Manang (3540 m).

Dave and Sandra

Standing upon the avalanche

The trekkers encounter snow and ice

A Stupa

 Prayer flags fly above a Stupa

A Stupa Flags flying on a stupa Snow and ice

A murder of crows

Children collecting ‘offerings’

Herding goats

Manang

Manang

That night was not just a celebration for us but for the guides and porters a chance to let down their hair for the Tihar Festival.


Celebration Celebrating the Tihar Festival Music and Dancing

A night of celebration

Celebrating the Tihar Festival

Music and dancing

Offerings

Offerings

[The Outward Journey] [Day 1 - Besisahar to Bhulbhule] [Day 2 - Bhulbhule  to Bahundanda] [Day 3 - Bahundanda  to Chyamche]

[Day 4 - Chyamche to Danakyu] [Day 5 - Danakyu to Chame] [Day 6 - Chame to Lower Pisang] [Day 7 - Lower Pisang to Manang]

[Day 8 - Manang to Chame] [Day 9 - Chame to Tal to Chyamche] [Day 10 Chyamche to Besisahar to Kathmandu]

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 The Annapurna Trek - Up Into the Snowline